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Metrology and Instrumentation for Biology and Environment

Last update: : Friday 17 July 2020, by Catherine Berger

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  The MIBE team

Many research projects at the Department of Ecology, Physiology and Ethology (DEPE) rely on sophisticated technologies for experimental implementation and gathering of scientific data on wild animals. The role of the MIBE is to develop innovative instrumentation that matches the specific experimental constraints faced by scientists at the DEPE, and, thus, promote the scientific-excellence of the DEPE team.

The MIBE team was founded in September 2010 and was able to build strongly on the available technical know-how of the IPHC (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien), especially with respect to measurements on wild animals through the use of encased electronic devices (bio-loggers). The MIBE has successfully developed, implemented and maintained various systems currently in use within the French Austral and Antarctic Territories (TAAF), for example automatic identification and weighing systems for penguins (Antavia, IPEV project), and rovers with embedded scientific equipment. Our department also develops, manufactures and markets bio-loggers. For example, we have developed bio-loggers to gather physiological and environmental data under harsh environmental conditions (temperature, dive depth, etc.) over extended periods.

We are continuously working towards an extreme miniaturization of bio-logging devices and have developed a number of prototypes (weight < 2 g; recording duration >2 years). Currently, our team is working on wireless data loggers and devices developed within the context of the ‘Internet of things’. Devices developed in our department are also of great relevance to other related scientific disciplines, such as botanic or oceanography.

Team composition

Name E-mail Phone Number
MIBE Team Members
Permanents
Mathieu BRUCKER (+33) (0)3 88 10 62 25
Nicolas CHATELAIN (+33) (0)3 88 10 69 41
Julien COURTECUISSE (+33) (0)3 88 10 69 35
Francis CRENNER (+33) (0)3 88 10 69 01
Robin LAESSER (+33) (0)3 88 10 69 26
The-Duc LE (+33) (0)3 88 10 69 38
Marc RICHER (+33) (0)3 88 10 65 85

  Bio-logging

Studying wild animals in their natural environment provides us with a glimpse into their ability to adapt to environmental change. It will also help us to better understand such change and might even allow us to use certain species as bio-indicators. Furthermore, understanding individual physiology is crucial to study the adaptive potential of species and provides valuable data for bio-medical research. For the success of these studies, scientific, methodological and technical challenges have to be mastered, which requires a strong multidisciplinary approach involving engineers and biologists.

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Research activities conducted at the DEPE involve wildlife monitoring using instruments attached to animals that record physiological and...

Research activities conducted at the DEPE involve wildlife monitoring using instruments attached to animals that record physiological and environmental data (bio-loggers) for extended periods. Such instrumentation has to comply with numerous technical specifications that are unique to each experimental application: miniaturization and low mass (e.g. 8 grams maximum for a rook), pressure resistance (e.g. more than 300m dives for Penguins), resistance to low temperature (e.g. –30°C for emperor penguins in Antarctica), ultra-low power consumption to extend battery life up to several years (e.g. to study migration, hibernation). The MIBE team has a long history of developing such instruments, many of our loggers have been successfully deployed by scientists studying animals in the terrestrial, aerial and aquatic environment.
Currently, our loggers can be interfaced with sensors recording the following parameters: temperature (ambient or internal), pressure (dive depth or flight height), light (geo localization), 3D accelerometry (posture and energy expenditure), ECG (heart rate) and GPS localization. Our loggers have a maximum memory capacity of 4 Gb. They are programmed according to user specifications and are ready for field deployment, once an animal has been captured. To retrieve the recorded data, recapture of the animal is required and can occur up to several years after the original deployment. The harsh conditions experienced by bio-loggers (sea water proofing under a pressure of up to 40 bars) makes the casing of electronic components challenging. The total weight of a device (electronic board, battery, packaging) carried by the animal should be as little as possible to reduce instrument effects to a minimum. As a rule of thumb, a device should not exceed 4% of individual body mass for swimming and terrestrial locomotion, and 2% for flying animals. Devices should also be hydro/aero-dynamically shaped and placed on the animal in a way that reduces drag effects.

 
The MIBE team: design, development and realisation of different types of bio-loggers

Bio-loggers LUL

 
The LUL is the tiniest bio-logger of the family. While measuring temperature, light and pressure every minute, it provides a 1.5 years life time for a total weight (including batteries and casing) of just 2.0 grams. Casing is customizable according to the intended use (biocompatible casing for implantation or pressure resistant for deep diving use); the size and nature of batteries can be adapted to the application and the temperature conditions.
 

LUL “Logger Ultra Light "

The LUL is the tiniest bio-logger of the family. While measuring temperature, light and pressure every minute, it provides a 1.5 years life time for a total weight (including batteries and casing) of just 2.0 grams. Casing is customizable according to the intended use (biocompatible casing for implantation or pressure resistant for deep diving use) ; the size and nature of batteries can be adapted to the application and the temperature conditions.

Specifications

General
Sampling period: from 1sec to 24h
Memory size: 64 MB
Programmable start delay: from 1 min to 1 year
Operating temperature: - 40°C to + 70°C

Temperature measurement
ADC : 16 bits
Range: -35 to +65 °C
Accuracy: ±0.5 °C (-20°C to +85°C @ 850 mbar) (altimeter)
  ±0.1 °C (+20°C to +40°C @ 850 mbar) (altimeter)
  ±1 °C (+0°C to +40°C @ 1000 mbar) (depth sensor 300 m)
  ±2 °C (-20°C à +85°C @ 30 000 mbar) (depth sensor 300 m)
Resolution: <0.01 °C
Time constant in water with standard casing: 22 sec.
Pressure measurement
In water, with 30 bar sensor
Depth range: 0 to 300 m
Accuracy: ± 50 cm. (for a range of: 0 to 60 m and 0 to 40°C)
Resolution: ± 3 cm
In water, with 5 bar sensor
Depth range: 0 to 50 m
Accuracy: ± 50 cm. (for a range of: 0 to 60 m and 0 to 40°C)
Resolution: ± 3 cm
In air,
Altitude range: 0 to 5000m
Accuracy: ± 40 cm (from 0 to 60°C)( ± 10 cm at 20°C)
Resolution: ± 1 cm

Light measurement
ADC : 16 bits
0.045 to 188 000 lux


Physical dimensions
Electronics size: 16 x 8 x 4 mm
Electronics weight: 0.76 g

Configuration example:
Pressure + Temperature + Light measured every minute,
with 19 mAh battery >> Life time 1.5 years for 2.0g total weight.

Low temperature LUL version, with battery for long term operation at -35°C

Low temperature operation requires a special battery, which doesn’t exist in ultra-small weight and dimensions.

Battery: 17 x 15 x 7 mm 5,0 grams

LUL with battery and casing: 22 x 21 x 15 mm 7,7 grams (see pictures).

Lifetime of loggers versus acquisition periods for: Pressure P, temperature T and light L (exemples):
PTL = 1”, 10”, 10” > 320 days (10 months)
PTL = 2”, 10”, 10” > 550 days (1.5 years)
PTL = 4”, 10”, 10” > 860 days (3.2 years)

*When > -15°C operation is convenient, another battery technology can be used, thus reducing weight and size of the logger. Please contact us for discussion.
*Casing is designed on demand.

Bio-logger WACU

 
This data logger combines PTL measurements (pressure, temperature, light) with 3D acceleration recordings. Extremely low power consumption brings outstanding life time/small and light-weight characteristics, while the 4 GB memory allows users to store a huge quantity of data. Casing is customizable according to the intended use (biocompatible casing for implantation or pressure resistant casing for deep dive use); the size and type of batteries can be adapted to the application and temperature conditions.
 

Bio-logger WACU : Accelerometer logger

This data logger combines PTL measurements (pressure, temperature, light) with 3D acceleration recordings. Extremely low power consumption brings outstanding life time/small and light-weight characteristics, while the 4 GB memory allows users to store a huge quantity of data. Casing is customizable according to the intended use (biocompatible casing for implantation or pressure resistant casing for deep dive use); the size and type of batteries can be adapted to the application and temperature conditions

Specifications

General
Sampling period for PTL: from 1sec to 24h
Sampling frequency for 3D acceleration: from 1 Hz to 50 Hz
Memory size: 4 GB
Programmable start delay
Operating temperature: -40°C to +70°C


Temperature measurement
ADC : 16 bits.
Range : -35 to +65 °C
Accuracy : ±2 °C
Resolution : 0.01 °C
Time constant in water with standard casing : < 1 min

Pressure measurement
In water, with 30 bar sensor :
Depth range : 300 m
Accuracy: ± 50 cm
resolution ±3 mbar
In air :
Altitude range : 5000m
Accuracy : ± 1.5 mbar
Resolution 0.1 mbar.

Light measurement
ADC : 16 bits
0.045 to 188 000 lux


3 axis Acceleration measurements
Acceleration range: ± 2G, ± 4G or ±8 G
Resolution at ± 2 g : 16mg to 1mg / 8 ou 12 bits
Sampling frequency: selectable 1, 10, 25 or 50 Hz

Physical dimensions
Electronics size: 21 x 13 x 4 mm
Electronics weight: 1.7 g

Configuration example:
P+T+L measurements every second, Acc. at 10Hz,
with a 5g battery >> Life time: 2 years.

WILOGG : Wireless LOGGer

 
A strong request from the users of bio-logging equipment is the possibility of a remote data download during deployment. This would avoid the need to recapture equipped individuals for data retrieval. The MIBE team is currently developing a GPS accelerometer with remote download capabilities. If realised, recorded data can be gathered when animals are within a few meters of a base station, while at the same time, a new acquisition configuration can be set up. Additional battery reloading capabilities will also be developed, supplying the energy for communication and extending data acquisition possibilities.
 

WILOGG: Wireless LOGGer

A strong request from the users of bio-logging equipment is the possibility of a remote data download during deployment. This would avoid the need to recapture equipped individuals for data retrieval.
The MIBE team is currently developing a GPS accelerometer with remote download capabilities. If realised, recorded data can be gathered when animals are within a few meters of a base station, while at the same time, a new acquisition configuration can be set up. Additional battery reloading capabilities will also be developed, supplying the energy for communication and extending data acquisition possibilities.

GEOBIRD ANR Project

 
Partners : France Energies Marines (pilotage), EDF énergies nouvelles, Agence des Aires Marines Protégées, Ailes Marines, Eolfi, , société Parc du Banc de Guerande, Bretagne Vivante, CEFE-CNRS, IPHC-CNRS.
This work is supported by a public grant overseen by the French National Research Agency (ANR) as part of the « Investissements d’avenir » program (reference : ANR-10-IEED-0006-15 )

The development of marine renewable energies will require the development of offshore wind parks. The planning and final acceptance of such wind parks requires environmental impact studies. One of the key issues in this context concerns the avifauna and, in particular, sea bird populations that are protected by national and international regulations.
 

GEOBIRD ANR Projet

PDF - 667.9 kb
plaquette du projet GEOBIRD

Partners : France Energies Marines (pilotage), EDF énergies nouvelles, Agence des Aires Marines Protégées, Ailes Marines, Eolfi, , société Parc du Banc de Guerande, Bretagne Vivante, CEFE-CNRS, IPHC-CNRS.

This work is supported by a public grant overseen by the French National Research Agency (ANR) as part of the « Investissements d’avenir » program (reference : ANR-10-IEED-0006-15 )

The development of marine renewable energies will require the development of offshore wind parks. The planning and final acceptance of such wind parks requires environmental impact studies. One of the key issues in this context concerns the avifauna and, in particular, sea bird populations that are protected by national and international regulations.

Continuous observation of animals in the wild is logistically challenging and often impossible. Currently available technology does not match the needs. This is especially the case for the study of diving birds or mid-sized pelagic seabirds (weighing less than 0.5 kg), like puffins.

Bringing together recognized experts in the field and cutting-edge technology, the Geobird project aims to develop a smart instrumentation with advanced communicating skills that could be used on vulnerable marine avifauna.

The MIBE Team is in charge of developing a geolocation tag based on GNSS technology that will be integrated in a data-logger collecting environmental and physiological data. Stored data will be transmitted through cell-phone networks. The purpose of the project is the development of a new bio-logger with advanced communication skills and an accuracy, lifetime and minimized weight superior to any devices currently available on the market.

PROJECT GOALS :

  • Develop a miniature geolocation tag for the study of mid-sized avifauna (puffins, small gulls, diving seabirds, etc.)
  • Improve current knowledge of the concerned avifauna to reinforce impact studies and secure authorisations for the development of the marine renewable energy sector.

GOALS FROM THE ‘FEM’ ROADMAP:

  • Develop projects to study the environmental impacts of marine renewable energies, so that sufficient leverage for their promotion can be created
  • Provide methodological tools for impact studies concerning marine renewable energies and their network connection facilities.

  Scientific applications

Adaptive strategies and population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints

 
The Antavia program, supported by the French Polar Institute IPEV, has gathered a unique database. This has been achieved through the development of cutting edge technology (e.g. mobile Radio Frequency Identification antennas, automatic weighing and identification systems, remotely operated vehicles carrying scientific equipment [rovers]) that minimizes disturbance to the animals and reduces scientific bias. The Antavia program studies adaptive strategies and the population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints (king penguins on Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, as well as Adélie and emperor penguins in Antarctica.
 

Adaptive strategies and population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints

The Antavia program, supported by the French Polar Institute IPEV, has gathered a unique database. This has been achieved through the development of cutting edge technology (e.g. mobile Radio Frequency Identification antennas, automatic weighing and identification systems, remotely operated vehicles carrying scientific equipment [rovers]) that minimizes disturbance to the animals and reduces scientific bias. The Antavia program studies adaptive strategies and the population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints (king penguins on Crozet and Kerguelen Islands, as well as Adélie and emperor penguins in Antarctica.

The Antavia project, an ‘observatory of life’, studies the life history traits of penguin populations, such as structural size during hatching and/or fledging, age-specific survival, recruitment parameters and breeding performance, sex-ratios, etc. The consequences of environmental changes on life history traits can then be evaluated for cohorts of penguins of known age.

Transponder tags allow the automated identification of animals along their passageways as they enter or leave the colony. A major advantage of these tags is their small size and mass (< 1 g), so that implantation just under the skin of the animals is feasible, avoiding external banding.
For example, the automated identification system in Adélie Land (Antarctica) allows the study of colonies located in little canyons, which concentrate the movement patterns of birds along narrow passageways. When these penguins cross electronically equipped gateways, they are identified (via two antennas) and weighed, so that the commute between the colony and their feeding site at sea is recorded. The data collected opens up a multitude of possible investigations. For example, it allows to investigate how individuals store and use their energy reserves in relation to life history traits (sex, age, experience, quality) and environmental change (especially prey availability).

Penguin robots to understand the structure and functioning of colonies

 
Work conducted within our program sustained by the French polar institute IPEV (‘Adaptive strategies and population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints’) showed that rovers can be used to approach micro-tagged penguins for Identification (RFID-tags) and also to study their acoustic communication, while avoiding the disturbance caused by human presence. Our results were published in Nature Methods and were disseminated worldwide through the media.
 

Penguin robots to understand the structure and functioning of colonies

Work conducted within our program sustained by the French polar institute IPEV (‘Adaptive strategies and population dynamics of penguins under environmental constraints’) showed that rovers can be used to approach micro-tagged penguins for Identification (RFID-tags) and also to study their acoustic communication, while avoiding the disturbance caused by human presence. Our results were published in Nature Methods and were disseminated worldwide through the media.

With the support of the Total Foundation, the Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien develops innovative penguin-robots to study the biology of penguins.

Through this advanced technology we can identify and locate electronically tagged birds, which allows to study their population dynamics and also helps to better understand the operating mechanisms within and the structure of king penguin and emperor penguins colonies. The objective remains to better understand penguin colonies and to study how their structure will evolve in the face of present climate change and its effect on resource availability.

Emperor penguins show no territorial defence behaviour. This allows them to huddle tightly during the winter, which reduces their energy expenditure and ensures survival. However, due to this lack of territorial boundaries and their general shyness, they retreat in most cases when approached by a rover, avoiding electronic identification. By contrast, when the rover is camouflaged with a penguin model, it is always possible to approach an emperor penguin to within the short distance required for its electronic identification without causing the stress inherent in any human presence. To mimic a real penguin, the rover must move with the appropriate movements of their flippers and feet, and occasionally even their neck. Such technical challenges are addressed in a cooperation with the Robotics Laboratory of the prestigious Research Institute against Cancer of the Digestive System in Strasbourg (IRCAD). Furthermore, to provide our rover with the most realistic appearance, we collaborate with taxidermy experts at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and also with special effects experts in the film industry.

Finally, we will share our expertise with teams working on particularly threatened penguin species (Jackass penguins in South Africa and Humboldt and Magellanic penguins in Argentina and Chile) so that our new and less disturbing techniques can be rapidly implemented.

Reconnection of areas used by the European Hamster

 
One experiment within the EU-funded LIFE program ‘ALISTER’, concerning the study of population dynamics, evaluates the use of wildlife crossing gates by the European Hamster. The development and use of a Radio-Frequency Identification system installed on wildlife passages provides us with the opportunity to identify individuals and also to determine the time required to achieve a crossing.
 

Reconnection of areas used by the European Hamster

One experiment within the EU-funded LIFE program ‘ALISTER’, concerning the study of population dynamics, evaluates the use of wildlife crossing gates by the European Hamster. The development and use of a Radio-Frequency Identification system installed on wildlife passages provides us with the opportunity to identify individuals and also to determine the time required to achieve a crossing.

A portable battery-powered radio-identification reader can also be placed on a feeder or around a burrow.

Electromechanical device to measure associative learning of wild birds.

 
Cognitive abilities are generally thought to be at the heart of behavioral flexibility and decision-making optimization, driving the potential for individuals to quickly respond and adapt to environmental changes. Among cognitive abilities, innovation and learning show high variation between species. The EVOL-COG project, coordinated by Blandine Doligez, studies « Cognition in a changing world: testing the evolutionary potential of innovation and learning in the wild ».
 

Electromechanical device to measure associative learning of wild birds.

Cognitive abilities are generally thought to be at the heart of behavioral flexibility and decision-making optimization, driving the potential for individuals to quickly respond and adapt to environmental changes. Among cognitive abilities, innovation and learning show high variation between species. The EVOL-COG project, coordinated by Blandine Doligez, studies « Cognition in a changing world: testing the evolutionary potential of innovation and learning in the wild ». In this project, MIBE team carries out the design and manufacturing of an electromechanical device to measure associative learning in great tits and collared flycatchers in the wild in Sweden. The device is composed of: a transparent door, that obstructs the entrance of the nest during the nestling rearing period for a short duration, and three levers featuring perches in front of the door, each associated to a different colour. To open the door and access its nest, a bird must perch on the «right» lever identified by a given colour. After each success, the opening perch and its associated colour change position. With this device, it is therefore possible to measure the ability of birds to associate the reward (the door opening) to a given colour long the successive trials, and thus their associate learning capacity.

Partners : University Lyon 1, University Lyon - Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive – FR, University Strasbourg - Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien - FR, INRA Avignon - Biostatistique et Processus Spatiaux - FR, University of Aberdeen - School of Biological Sciences - UK, McGill University, - Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences

This work is supported by a public grant overseen by the French National Research Agency (ANR) as part of the « Investissements d’avenir » program (reference: ANR-19-CE02-0007)

  Internship

Joris GREDT (2020 May – June) – internship DUT Réseaux et Télécommunications

Joris GREDT (2020 May – June) – internship DUT Réseaux et Télécommunications

The Geobird project aims to develop a smart instrumentation with advanced communicating skills that could be used on vulnerable marine avifauna. The MIBE Team is in charge of developing a geolocation tag based on GNSS technology that will be integrated in a data-logger collecting environmental and physiological data. Stored data will be transmitted through cell-phone networks.
The internship aim is to adapt the data reception software of the Geobird project. The initial reception program works with a MySQL database, and the objective is to change the data storage system to NoSQL (MongoDB) DBMS.

Main goals:
- Migrate the initial MySQL database to MongoDB while keeping data relations
- Adapt the data reception and storage software to the new database
- Provide documents and commented solution for simple maintenance

Nicolas KIRCHHOFFER (2020 May – June) – Internship DUT Réseaux et Télécommunications

Nicolas KIRCHHOFFER (2020 May – June) – Internship DUT Réseaux et Télécommunications

The Geobird project aims to develop a smart instrumentation with advanced communicating skills that could be used on vulnerable marine avifauna. The MIBE Team is in charge of developing a geolocation tag based on GNSS technology that will be integrated in a data-logger collecting environmental and physiological data. Stored data will be transmitted through cell-phone networks.
The internship aim is to provide a new web interface, so that it can be more elegant and maintainable. The interface is separated into two components, the interface itself, which uses Vue and an API server, which provides data to the interface. The integration of a new storage engine, MongoDB, was taken into account to build the API server for the NoSQL technology. This will bring better performances for the end-user.

Main goals:
- Design a new structure for the web interface
- Adapt the API server to MongoDB instead of MySQL
- Provide documents and commented solution for simple maintenance
- Introduce DevOps and Big Data notions to the project

  Publications

Publications

  • Jeantet, Lorene, Dell’Amico, F., Forin-Wiart, Marie Amélie, Coutant, M., Bonola, M., Etienne, D., Gresser, J., Regis, S., Lecerf, N., Lefebvre, F., de Thoisy, B., Le Maho, Yvon, Brucker, Mathieu, Chatelain, Nicolas, Laesser, Robin, Crenner, Francis, Handrich, Yves, Wilson, Rory P & Chevallier, Damien. (2018). Combined use of two supervised learning algorithms to model sea turtle behaviours from tri-axial acceleration data. The Journal of Experimental Biology,2018
  • Tissier, M. L., Bousquet, C. a. H., Fleitz, J., Chatelain, N., Habold, C. & Handrich, Y. (2018). An anti-predation device to facilitate and secure the crossing of small mammals in motorway wildlife underpasses. (II) Validation with the European hamster under semi-natural conditions. Ecol. Eng. 125, 106-110. ,2018
  • Kletty F, Tissier M, Kourkgy C et al. (2019). A focus on the European hamster to illustrate how to monitor endangered species. Integrative Zoology 14, 65–74. ,2018
  • Chambault, Philippine, Roquet, F., Benhamou, S., Baudena, A., Paladino, Frank V., Pauthenet, E., De Thoisy, B., Crasson, R., Brucker, Mathieu, Bonola, Marc, Dos Reis, V., Le Maho, Yvon & Chevallier, Damien. (2017). The Gulf Stream frontal system: A key oceanographic feature in the habitat selection of the leatherback turtle? Deep-Sea Research Part I-Oceanographic Research papers 123, 35-47.,2017
  • Michel Widmann, Akiko Kato, Ben Raymond, Frédéric Angelier, Benjamin Arthur, Olivier Chastel, Marie Pellé, Thierry Raclot and Yan Ropert-Coudert,2015
  • Le Maho, Yvon, Whittington, Jason D., Hanuise, Nicolas, Pereira, Louise, Boureau, Matthieu, Brucker, Mathieu, Chatelain, Nicolas, Courtecuisse, Julien, Crenner, Francis, Friess, Benjamin, Grosbellet, Edith, Kernaleguen, Laëtitia, Olivier, Frédérique, Saraux, Claire, Vetter, Nathanaël, Viblanc, Vincent A., Thierry, Bernard, Tremblay, Pascale, Groscolas, René & Le Bohec, Céline. (2014). Rovers minimize human disturbance in research on wild animals. Nature Methods 11, 1242-1244.,2014
  • Laure Pelletier, André Chiaradia, Akiko Kato, Yan Ropert-Coudert,2014
  • B Raymond, M-A Lea, T Patterson, V Andrews-Goff, R Sharples, R Alderman, J-B Charrassin, M Cottin, L Emmerson, N Gales, R Gales, S Goldsworthy, C Guinet, R Harcourt, A Kato, Y Ropert-Coudert, C Southwell, J van den Hoff, B Wienecke, EJ Woehler, S Wotherspoon, MA Hindell,2014
  • Yan Ropert-Coudert, Akiko Kato, Xavier Meyer,Marie Pellé, Andrew JJ MacIntosh, Frédéric Angelier, Olivier Chastel, Michel Widmann, Ben Arthur, Ben Raymond, Thierry Raclot,2014
  • Gaston AJ, Elliott KH, Ropert-Coudert Y, Kato A, MacDonald C, Mallory ML ,2013
  • Isabel Afán, Joan Navarro, Laura Cardador, Francisco Ramírez, Akiko Kato, Beneharo Rodríguez, Yan Ropert-Coudert, Manuela G. Forero,2013
  • Cottin M, Raymond B, Kato A, Amelineau F, Le Maho Y, Raclot T, Galton-Fenzi B, Meijers A, Ropert-Coudert Y ,2012
  • Le Bohec C., Gauthier-Clerc M., Gendner J.-P., Chatelain N. & Le Maho Y. (2003) Nocturnal predation of King penguin by giant petrels on Crozet Islands, Polar Biology, 26(9), 587-590,2003

Communications

  • Developping specific bio-logging tools to act for the conservation of the Common hamster Handrich Y. 1, Courtecuisse JJ.1, Eidenschenck J. 2, Kourkgy C. 2, Tissier M. 1,2,3, Habold C. 1 25thh meeting of the International Hamster Workgroup, 4-6 november 2018
  • The breeding-foraging dilemma in Adélie penguins, Planas-Bielsa V., Houstin A., Chatelain C., Courtecuisse J., Le Maho Y., Le Bohec C. Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research 2017
  • Insight into an Adélie penguin colony, Houstin A., Arduini L., Planas-Bielsa V., Chatelain N., Courtecuisse J., Le Maho Y., Richter S., Zitterbart D.P., Le Bohec C. Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research 2017
  • A multiple sensor bio-logger: WACU / Automatic Identification Systems, 1st Workshop on migrating birds, 2017
  • Yvon Le Maho, J. Courtecuisse, M. Brucker, T. Bressac, C. Cornec, E. Chevereau, P. Dufay, G.Lemonnier, N. Chatelain, P. Renaud, F. Crenner, C. Le Bohec. (2016). Les robots pour l’étude de la structure des colonies de manchots, Comité National Français des Recherches Arctiques et Antarctiques, 12e journées scientifiques de la recherche en milieux polaires
  • Courtecuisse J., Laesser R., Chatelain N., Le TD. and Crenner F (2014) Methodological challenges for studying penguin eco-physiology in remote environments. Proceedings of 20th Symposium of the International Society on Biotelemetry, 105–107.
  • Disentangling effects of oceanography and individual states on foraging patterns of a long-lived seabird, BLS5, Strasbourg, Tarroux Arnaud, Cherel Yves, Kato-Ropert Akiko, Love Oliver, Ropert-Coudert Yan, Varpe Aystein, Descamps Sébastien 2014
  • Personality and environmental heterogeneity in the Adélie penguin, Cornet C.C., Amélineau F., Babel D., Boureau M., Courtecuisse J., Cristofari R., Descamps S., Marpaux S., Morinay J., Whittington J.D., Le Maho Y. & Le Bohec C. (2014, July). Oral presentation at the 15th Conference of the International Society for Behavioural Ecology, New York, USA.
  • The adaptive capacities of Adélie penguins to face environmental variability: the role of heterogeneity within populations. Cornet C.C., Amélineau F., Babel D., Boureau M., Courtecuisse J., Cristofari R., Descamps S., Marpaux S., Morinay J., Saraux C., Whittington J.D., Le Maho Y. & Le Bohec C. (2013, September). Keynote presentation at the 8th International Penguin Conference, Bristol, UK.
  • Predict changes in polar ecosystems: biological adaptation and technological innovation. Le Bohec C., Whittington J.D., Ancel A., Chatelain N., Cornet C.C., Courtecuisse J., Crenner F., Cristofari R., Marpaux S., Allemand D., Le Maho Y. (2014, August) Oral presentation at the XXXIIIth SCAR Open Science Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Estimation du budget−temps chez la cistude d’Europe Emys orbicularis à partir d’enregistreurs embarqués de paramètres physiques simples. Atelier «Bio−logging, bio−télémétrie et ingénierie écologique au sein des ZA : mise en commun des informations et des ressources», Strasbourg, 6−7 mars 2013 Georges JY, Bresson F, Dallongeville O, Kato−Ropert A, Knibiely P, Levy M, Levresse F
  • Détection automatique des évènements de basking chez la cistude d’Europe Emys orbicularis. Journées Techniques cistude, Aix−les−Bains, 7−8 février 2013, Bresson F, Levresse F, Kato−Ropert A, Dallongeville O, Levy M, Knibiely P, Georges JY
  • Estimating time−budget in freshwater turtles using animal−borne simple sensors. Symposium in freshwater turtles conservation. Gaia Biological Park, Portugal, 22−24 May 2013 Georges JY, Bresson F, Brucker M, Chatelain N, Crenner F, Dallongeville O, Kato−Ropert A, Knibiely P, Laesser R, Lê TD, Levresse F, Levy M, Richer M
  • Adaptive strategies and population trends of penguins to predict changes in polar marine ecosystems. Le Bohec, C., Cornet, C., Cristofari, R., Whittington, J.D., Courtecuisse, J., Chatelain, N., Crenner, F., Allemand, D. & Le Maho, Y. (2013).Life in Antarctica 11th SCAR Biological Symposium, Barcelone (Espagne), juillet 2013.
  • Combination of Biotelemetry and Bio-logging: the ideal scheme? Francis Crenner, Julien Courtecuisse, Nicolas Chatelain and Yan Ropert-Coudert (2012) Proceedings of the 19th Symposium of the International Society on Biotelemetry, 64-67.
  • Bio-logger with remote communication capability, R. Laesser, M. Brucker, N. Chatelain, J. Courtecuisse, TD. Lê, M Richer and F. Crenner. (2016) International Society on Biotelemetry 21st Symposium May 22-24, Leuven, Belgium.
  • Penguin Life Observatories as indicators of climate impacts on SubAntarctic and Antarctic ecosystems. Céline Le Bohec, Denis Allemand, David Babel, Nicolas Chatelain, Cindy Cornet, Julien Courtecuisse, Francis Crenner, Jason D. Whittington, & Yvon Le Maho. Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research Conference 2012
  • Penguin Life Observatories as indicators of climate impacts on Sub Antarctic and Antarctic ecosystems. Le Bohec C., Allemand D., Babel D., Chatelain N, Cornet C., Courtecuisse J., Crenner F., Whittington J.O., Le Maho Y. (2012) SCAR International Biology Symposium
  • Field techniques for measuring free-ranging hamsters’ fitness. Habold, C., Criscuolo, F., Crenner, F., Gangloff, J., Blanc, S. & Handrich, Y. (2011). Strasbourg (France) 18th meeting of the International Hamster Workgroup, 14-17 octobre 2011.
  • Long-term data on unbanded penguins as indicators of climate impact on SubAntarctic and Antarctic ecosystems. C. Le Bohec, C. Saraux, B. Friess, M. Gauthier-Clerc, M. Beaulieu, N. Chatelain, Y. Le Maho. IPY Conference. June 2010, Oslo, Norway
  • Approaching penguins for identification: is a robot less stressing than humans? 7th International Penguin Conference. Boston, USA, Août 2010. Le Maho, Y., Friess, B., Brucker, M. & Groscolas, R.
  • Smaller tricks that last longer: new logger development for long-term deployment at the IPHC-CNRS, Strasbourg France. Ancel A., Anckenmann L., Arnold L., Baumann R., Beaulieu M., Brucker M., Charles L., Chatelain N., Claus G., Georges J.-Y., Handrich Y., Imhoff M., Laesser R., Médina P., Parisel C., Pellicioli M., Richer M. & Wabnitz C. International Society on Biotelemetry Symposium 2008
  • Heart rate loggers that analyse Ecg in real time: re-examining data collected for a deep diver, the King penguin. Handrich Y., Vandenabeele, S., Chatelain, N., Bost, C.-A. (2) & L.G. Halsey. International Society on Biotelemetry Symposium 2008

Posters

  • Georges, J.-Y., Bresson, F., Brucker, M., Chatelain, N., Crenner, F., Dallongeville, O., Kato, A., Knibiely, P., Laesser, R., Lê, T.D., Levresse, F., Levy, M. & Richer, M. (2014). Estimating time-budget in freshwater turtles using animal-borne simple sensors. BLS5. Strasbourg (France), 22-26 septembre 2014.
  • Foraging ecology of crested penguins during the pre-moult stage at Marion Island, BLS5, Strasbourg Whitehead Thomas, Ryan Peter, Ropert-Coudert Yan, Kato Akiko, 2014
  • Do random flight analyses highlight animal performances? Influence of individual characteristics on Lévy flight patterns in a wild seabird, BLS5, Strasbourg Sueur Cedric, Akodad Mohamed, Kato Akiko, Elliott Kyle, Gaston Anthony, Grosbellet Edith, Ropert-Coudert Yan, 2014
  • Foraging strategies of Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) throughout the breeding season and with changing sea-ice conditions, BLS5, Strasbourg Widmann Michel , Kato Akiko , Raymond Ben , Pellé Marie , Chastel Olivier , Angelier Frederic , Arthur Benjamin , Raclot Thierry , Ropert-Coudert Yan, 2014
  • The individual counts: Within sex differences in foraging strategies are as important as sex-specific differences in masked boobies, BLS5, Strasbourg Sommerfeld Julia, Kato Akiko, Ropert-Coudert Yan, Garthe Stefan, Hindell Mark, 2014
  • Fehlmann, G., Bodin, C., Brendel, C., Laesser, R. & Handrich, Y. (2013). Following animal’s behaviours: go beyond boundaries. 9es Rencontres "Ecology & Behaviour". Strasbourg (France), 22-26 avril 2013.
  • Le Bohec, C., Cornet, C., Cristofari, R., Whittington, J., Courtecuisse, J., Chatelain, N., Crenner, F., Allemand, D. & Le Maho, Y. (2013). Adaptive strategies and population trends of penguins to predict changes in polar marine ecosystems. XIth SCAR Biology Symposium. Barcelona (Espagne), 15-19 juillet 2013.
  • Cornet, C., Amelineau, F., Babel, D., Boureau, M., Courtecuisse, J., Cristofari, R., Descamps, S., Marpaux, S., Morinay, J., Whittington, J., Le Maho, Y. & Le Bohec, C. (2013). Personality and its effect on fitness in the Adélie penguin. XIth SCAR Biology Symposium. Barcelona (Espagne), 15-19 juillet 2013.
  • 10th SCAR International Biology Symposium. July 2009, Sapporo, Japan. Ropert-Coudert Y., Le Maho Y., Ancel A., Beaulieu M., Chatelain N., Chiaradia A., Friess B., Geiger S., Gilbert C., Kato A., Le Bohec C., Le Vaillant M., Raclot T., Saraux C., Spée M., Zimmer I. “PICASO: Penguins as Indicators of Climate Anomalies in the Southern Ocean.”
  • Population dynamic of the king penguin: assessing life-history traits using data collected by an automatic identification system. Le Bohec C., Gauthier-Clerc M., Gendner J.P., Chatelain N., Le Maho Y.
  • Long-term study of a king penguin population using an automatic identification system. Le Bohec C., Gauthier-Clerc M., Gendner J.P., Chatelain N., Le Maho Y. European Union for Bird Ringing , 2003

Contact : Technical manager, Julien COURTECUISSE) | Scientific coordinator, Yves HANDRICH)

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