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DEPE | Séminaires BEEPSS / BEEPSS Seminars » Density-dependent eco-physiological response in Brandt’s vole populations (...)

Density-dependent eco-physiological response in Brandt’s vole populations under environmental changes.
Long-term population dynamics of two hamster species in North China Plain.

Last update: : Friday 13 May 2016, by Nicolas Busser

Date : Vendredi 3 juin 2016 2015 à 13h
Lieu : IPHC, Amphithéâtre Grünewald, bâtiment 25


Dr. Guoliang Li, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Density-dependent eco-physiological response in Brandt’s vole populations under environmental changes

Brandt’s vole (Lasiopodomys brandtii) is a dominant rodent species of the typical steppe habitat in Inner Mongolia. In this talk, we will introduce the on-going long-term manipulative experiment, started from 2010, which is focused on the eco-physiological responses of Brandt’s voles to food supply, rainfall and livestock grazing. We will also report some available results about the effects of grazing. In this study, we found sheep grazing had no effect on vole abundance in the first year but an overall negative effect on vole abundance in the following 3 years. Successive grazing caused decreases in survival and male body mass of voles, but had no significant effect on fecundity. Sheep grazing also significantly decreased the proportion of spring-born cohort, but increased the proportion of summer-born cohort. More results and collaborations are expected in the following few years.


Dr. Chuan Yan, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Yan, Long-term population dynamics of two hamster species in North China Plain

Two ‘pest’ rodent species, the Chinese striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis, Pallas, 1773) and greater long-tailed hamster (Tscherskia triton, de Winton, 1899) in Northern China Plain have experienced large climate change and agricultural disturbance for the last 30 years, which resulted in drastic annual and seasonal population changes. We found that their population dynamics was closely related to environmental disturbance and their body mass shift, physiological condition and genetic diversity. By using long-term monitoring data, we found local climate and irrigation might interactively cause the population decline of the two species. Strong density-dependent feedbacks occurred at both annual and seasonal scales. The warmer weather increased population sizes in non-breeding seasons, but this effect was counteracted by the negative effect of flood irrigation in breeding seasons.